TUTUBAN’S FOODSTREET

A trip down Tutuban’s foodstreet is a must for everyone! Street dishes are all the rage in the world’s culinary capitals, but we all know that these informal food feasts originated in Asia.
                                    
Manila, of course, is one of the top destinations for the practical and adventurous diner. Tutuban Center’s “FoodStreet” is a fine example of a gustatory district that attracts people from all walks of life for its simple, makeshift and unassuming stalls.

In these trying times, people are wisely cutting back on spending at restaurants and even fast-food joints. Street food—fresh, inexpensive, ready to eat—are more often preferred by the budget conscious. You can choose from a wide variety of food and beverages that recall the taste of home-cooked meals while having the feeling that you are dining out.

Now more than ever, being a street-food trader makes a lot of financial sense. For the innately entrepreneurial, Tutuban’s FoodStreet is offering spaces for rent. Situated at the main thoroughfares of the historic and commercial mall, future tenants will have a captured market among shoppers, students and the working/professional class.

For its small size, a street-food enterprise only requires a small amount of capital. The trader only needs the most basic cooking skills, management acumen, simple facilities and of course, his serving of affordable yet delicious lunches, dinners and snacks.

Though small scale, this type of venture has a big potential for generating income—even employment—so it isn’t impossible for the street-food trader to have average earnings that can be three to even 10 times more than the minimum-wage worker. His profits can even be more than the earnings of skilled employees. More importantly, you can now be your own boss after growing tired of the corporate rat race. It can also be a sound investment, too, especially if you are a returning overseas Filipino worker or if you’re a bored housewife with excellent culinary skills, a FoodStreet stall is definitely perfect.

Tutuban’s FoodStreet’s location at the historic former railway station is fitting because it is a reflection of the exciting local culture as manifested on the food fare being served. Appetizing offerings include Hong Kong-style noodles; Chinese siopao and siomai; Persian shawarma; the very Pinoy silog, isaw, balut, chicharon, fishballs and banana cues; or even inihaw na liempo, pusit, manok, bangus; and delicious English muffins and American baked goodies.

The prospective food trader may not only earn high incomes but he will be helping the local economy as well in terms of taxes, as micro-industries such as street-selling promote financial self-sufficiency for families as well. For example, he sources his fresh ingredients and raw materials locally, thereby also benefiting the small-scale suppliers and farm growers.

One significant concern about street food, though, is health and sanitation. However, FoodStreet and Tutuban Center officials assure tenants that the mall administration takes this aspect of the business seriously. Hygiene, cleanliness and waste disposal will adhere to the strictest standards as imposed by law and the national and local health department.

Security of both the businessman and his consumers is also of utmost consideration. The mall’s roving and plainclothes security personnel will be on hand to ensure the safety of everyone.

So, harness that inherent entrepreneur in you and open your business at Tutuban Center’s FoodStreet and taste success—in your own terms.

Tutuban’s FoodStreet operations will be from 6 am to 12 midnight starting July 01, 2012. For leasing inquiries, contact: Gina Villamor and Mary Anne Suralta, 251-1661 local 125, or direct line, 253-1769.

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